Connecting for social development


Written by Asier Aramburu Climate Change RENEN Manager,.


It is estimated that approximately one billion people around the world do not have access to electricity. This fact slows down their socioeconomic development since it affects both their potential economic growth and key aspects of well-being such as health, nutrition and education.

In recent years, the countries of Central and South America have achieved high levels of electrification, but this evolution has moderated when they have reached to 90% -95% electrification. This is due to the fact that the remaining areas are difficult to access or they face some social or security difficulty. In the case of Colombia, these areas are concentrated in the so-called ZNIs.

The Non-Interconnected Zones (ZNI, acronym in Spanish) are formed by the Colombian territory that is not connected to the Central Interconnected System (SIN, acronym in Spanish). According to the latest data provided by the Superintendency of Home Public Services, it includes 52% of the country’s territory, with an estimated population of 1,900,000 inhabitants. Colombians living in these areas do not have public electricity service through the national grid and, therefore, depend on local generation solutions. These solutions are based mostly on diesel generators (96% of the total). The use of this fuel not only implies a considerable environmental impact, but also causes significant diseconomies of scale since 80% of the capacity is concentrated in plants with a capacity lower than 100 kW. Moreover, they have to deal with the high cost of the diesel and its volatility.

However, the electrification of these areas has been limited by geographical obstacles and conflicts in some regions, as well as the following barriers:

  • The population density is extremely low (an average of 3 inhabitants/km2), which makes the logistics of service attention difficult (high investment and operating costs per user).
  • Poor logistics and transportation infrastructure, and in some places non-existent.
  • Low level of average consumption.
  • Low payment capacity by users and therefore low level of collection of the companies’ portfolio.
  • High levels of losses.

Therefore, a vicious circle that has not yet been broken is created. Getting out of this circle is even more important for Colombia if it is considering that the ZNIs concentrate most of the territory that has suffered most of the violence. Thus, ensuring their access to electricity is a necessary step to allow their development and advance in the resolution of the conflict.

As stated before, the traditional method of promoting electrification, the expansion of the national grid, has proven insufficient to achieve 100% of national coverage. For this reason, distributed generation has become the most suitable solution for the electrification of these areas. Although the electricity supplied with minigrids under normal conditions has a cost substantially higher than the average cost of the interconnected system, minigrids are competitive in those locations where extending the main network is even more expensive. In addition, in order to complete the cost-benefit analyses, the social cost of not having a basic minimum supply of electricity and the lack of reliability in the supply should be included as externalities. By including these costs, these projects would be more feasible and the considerable social benefit would be measured in economic terms. In contrary, not including them will lead to a minimum cost solution: not to incur in any cost, that is, not to electrify the area.

Furthermore, based on this alternative, the non-interconnected areas of Colombia have enormous potential to switch from fossil fuels to clean energy. And it is that, although Colombia is experiencing an accelerated expansion of its generation capacity from non-conventional renewable energies, most of these projects are focused on supplying energy to the SIN.

As previously stated, developers (both private and public) must overcome numerous difficulties to implement generation projects in the ZNIs. These regions are supplied by independent operators that do not have enough volume to launch massive electrification projects. Furthermore, the have serious difficulties in accessing financial markets due to limitations in the payment capacity of their users. Thus, these projects are generally not attractive projects for private investors and additional resources are required. The carbon market is one important source of income that can support these projects development.

ALLCOT has led the validation of the Inírida Solar Farm project (Inírida, Guainía), the largest solar project developed in the ZNI (2.5 MW). This project represents a fundamental milestone for these regions and offers a referent that can be replicated to allow the transition of these networks to renewable energies.

The Inírida Solar Farm project consists of a photovoltaic solar plant that covers around 22% of the municipality’s energy demand and allows an annual reduction in emissions of approximately 2,800 tCO2e. This reduction is achieved thanks to the fact that this plant replaces part of the energy generated by the diesel fuel plant that fed the entire local distribution network of Inírida. Now, this network will benefit from a hybrid generation system (solar + diesel), in such a way that the reliability of the system will be ensured due to the diesel generation when is needed.

The electrification of the ZNI through mini-grids powered by renewable energies will be key in achieving the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 7 and for universal access to energy in Colombia. Thanks to this important milestone, a gap that slows down the improvement in the quality of life of almost two million people will be closer to be overcome. We invite you to consult more information about the project at the following link.

ALLCOT will participate in two projects under Article 6.2 of the Paris Agreement for the generation of ITMOs.

ALLCOT has signed two consulting contracts for projects in Senegal and the Dominican Republic aiming to provide ITMOs to Switzerland and Sweden, respectively

An important difference between the approaches of Article 6 of the Paris Agreement and the market mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol (CDM) is that, under the Paris Agreement, all countries have emission reduction targets in the form of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). Article 6 of the Paris Agreement provides countries with a framework for cooperation in their efforts to limit climate change through the use of carbon units, called International Transfer Mitigation Results (ITMOs) to achieve their NDCs. The generation of ITMOs contribute to increasing the global ambition committed by countries under Article 6.2 of the Paris Agreement by promoting low-carbon technologies and accelerating the implementation of projects and programs. Cooperative approaches are a fundamental tool to achieve the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction goals established by each country in its NDC. All projects and programs that voluntarily participate in these cooperative approaches must promote sustainable development and ensure environmental integrity as well as transparency.

At the end of last year, ALLCOT Group signed two contracts for ITMOS generation projects from two different countries:

  • Senegal: project for sustainable waste management in Africa funded by the Foundation for Climate Protection and Carbon Offset KLIK (KLIK Foundation). ALLCOT Group will provide its consultancy services for the elaboration of technical documentation (Mitigation Activity Description Document – MADD) that will serve as the basis for the subsequent governmental approval and commercialization of ITMOs to comply with the Swiss NDC.
  • Dominican Republic: it is a mitigation project managed by a Norwegian company, AMMADOL BIO, which consists of reducing greenhouse gases generated by the Agricultural and Farming Sector in the Dominican Republic through the implementation and transfer of Dutch technology to capture biogas and provide ITMOs to Sweden. Like with the Senegal project, ALLCOT Group will provide its consultancy services for the MADD elaboration.

Since its inception, ALLCOT Group has been committed to guaranteeing environmental integrity, transparency, and promoting sustainable development aligned with the 2030 Agenda and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) allowing for solid governance agreements.

With more than ten years of experience, the ALLCOT Group technical team is specialized in the market mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol and, with the signing of these two new contracts, reaffirms and strengthens the trajectory to be one of the main players in the implementation of Article 6 of the Paris Agreement.

Mahindra Racing first Formula E team and FIA World Championship entrant to be certified net Zero Carbon Footprint since inception

  • The most sustainable team on the grid becomes the first Formula E outfit and first FIA World Championship entrant to be certified Net Zero Carbon footprint
  • Pledges to the UNFCCC Sports for Climate Action Framework

As it continues its vital sustainability work at pace, Mahindra Racing is pleased to announce that it is the first Formula E team, and first FIA World Championship entrant, to be certified Net Zero Carbon footprint since inception. The certification has been approved by the ALLCOT Group for carbon emission offsetting for the entirety of the team’s existence.

The emission allowances have been marked for permanent removal from the pool of offsetting credits at the Environmental Registry on behalf of the team’s chosen REDD+ Project.

Established in 2009, ALLCOT is a leader in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions management tools and strategies for businesses of all sizes. By neutralizing GHG emissions, Mahindra Racing is not only able to protect the environment, but also provide community benefits that enhance profitability and brand value, increase employee satisfaction, to combat the climate crisis under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement, which is aligned with the UN 2030 Agenda, and promote the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

The REDD+ project protects 177,899 hectares of high conservation value rainforest in the state of Pará, Brazil and will prevent net emissions of >20 million tCO2e over the project lifetime. It is a registered Code REDD+ project; is validated and verified against VCS and in 2012 attained CCBA Gold level accreditation. This project protects threatened tree species like the pau rosa (Brazilian rosewood), provides jobs in forest management and monitoring, supports education in agro-forestry techniques to enable the community to grow cash crops, protects at risk animals like the Giant Anteater, Golden Parakeet and Ka’apor Capuchin Monkey and provides secured land tenure to villages committed to conservation.

In addition to Mahindra Racing’s Net Zero Carbon benchmark, it is also pleased to announce it has pledged to the UNFCCC Sports for Climate Action Framework alongside the FIA and Formula E. This initiative aims at supporting and guiding sports actors in achieving global climate change goals.

By committing to the framework, Mahindra Racing has pledged to five key principles; to undertake systematic efforts to promote greater environmental responsibility, to reduce overall climate impact, to educate for climate action, to promote sustainable and responsible consumption and to advocate for climate action through communication.

These new achievements add to the team’s previous sustainability endeavours including:

  • Becoming the first Formula E team in history to receive Three-Star Accreditation– the highest accolade in the FIA’s framework.
  • Committing to planting trees in the Araku Valley region of India thanks to its Season 6 tree planting campaign. Mahindra Racing’s efforts are in tandem with Mahindra Group’s commitment which has a commitment to plant 1 million trees every year
  • Partnering with One All Sports as its team kit supplier; a natural choice due to their shared vision and dedication to the use of sustainable materials, applications and processes.

“We believe that ‘doing good’ goes beyond philanthropy and CSR, it is more than just random acts of kindness. ‘Doing good’ is a purpose, an attitude, and a way of life; it is our guide for conducting business and ourselves. As a team that is committed to finding credible, advanced and next generation mobility solutions while being kind to the planet. At Mahindra Racing, we pledge to greater ROCE, which, for us, stands for Return On Climate and Environment. This is ingrained into our ethos and a big part of the reason we are racing in Formula E. We have been on this path of reducing our impact on the planet since our birth in 2014 and six years later we are carbon neutral since inception. We are also certified with Three-Star Excellence in sustainability. To this end, our efforts are and will continue to be, in tandem with Mahindra Group’s commitment and quest to achieve group-wide carbon neutrality. We look forward to kickstarting season 7 with ROCE as our guiding principle, towards setting innovative, competitive yet sustainable mobility benchmarks for the world.”

Dilbagh Gill, CEO and Team Principal.

“It is a great achievement for Mahindra Racing to become certified net zero carbon since inception. Mahindra Racing has become a leader in sustainability across the sporting landscape and promotes sustainable business practices across their supply chain. As the first Formula E team to attain FIA Three-star Environmental Accreditation and the most recent team to sign the UNFCCC Sports for Climate Action Framework, they are the perfect partners in the fight against climate change. The first manufacturer to join the Formula E grid and now the first to commit to Gen3, we’re delighted to have a long and ongoing relationship with another organisation so aligned to our vision and values.”

 Jamie Reigle, CEO, Formula E.

We are very proud and excited to be part of the Mahindra Racing sustainability team. Mahindra’s values and beliefs echoes our own. Sustainability or good management through Sustainable Development Goals are at the heart of Mahindra’s drive. It translates into these great achievements that we hope will inspire and lead to a virtuous competition among its pairs. Regardless, it sets great precedents that we aim to continue working and exceed whenever possible”.

Alexis Leroy, CEO, ALLCOT Group.


Systemic Risk


Written by Enrique Lendo, Business Development Mexico Advisor.


The World Economic Forum (WEF) released its 2021 Global Risk Report last week. Climate and environmental risk were ranked at top in its tables in terms of likelihood and second, after Infectious diseases, in terms of impact. It is highly likely that a standard will be set for countries and companies where climate impacts will be perceived as riskier than economic, geopolitical and technological ones.

Climate change impacts capital markets through two types of risk. The first one is Physical Risk which results from damages to property, infrastructure and land. The other one is Transitional Risk which is associated with changes in regulations, technology and consumer/investor preferences towards low carbon economic growth. Risk exposure varies from one country to another depending on geographical, physical and economic conditions. Mexico is a highly vulnerable country, with a high physical risk profile, due to its geographical location between two oceans, complex topography and irregular human settlements.

In 2020, global greenhouse gas went down 7% due to mobility restrictions from the Pandemic. However, temperature records were broken once again with a cumulative increase of 1.25 °C with respect to industrial levels. To avoid catastrophic impacts, scientists recommend global temperature increase to stabilize at 1.5 °C by the end of the century, leaving a very limited space for maneuvering.

At higher temperatures, climate impacts and associated physical risks exacerbate. According to Swiss Re, 2020 was the fifth costliest year for insurance companies in 40 years, with $83 billion dollars in losses. Cyclone Amphan displaced 4.9 million people in India and costed $13 billion dollars in losses, while hurricanes in the United States and Central America displaced 200 thousand people and costed $40 billion dollars. For financial institutions, physical risk materializes through exposure to companies, buildings and countries which are impacted by climate change.  Insurance companies face losses and increase their sure primes, banks face loan defaults and assets in impacted zones tend to depreciate.

Transition risk has been increasing because more countries have committed to “net zero” targets and more consumers and investors demand companies to act responsibly. In his first day in office, Joe Bide signed executive orders to rejoin the Paris Agreement on climate change and revert Trump´s Administration initiatives that lowered standards on environment and climate change issues, while Janet Yellen promised to strengthen climate risk policies in the financial sector. Biden´s Administration will invest $2 trillion dollars to finance the transition towards low carbon growth and will sanction with trade tariffs polluting countries.

Climate risk is transforming capital markets. It is now riskier for banks and investment funds to finance oil and gas projects than clean energy ones, because the latter are more cost effective and better accepted by society. In 2021, global investment in clean energy will overtake investment in fossil fuels. Last week, Larry Fink, CEO of BlackRock, the largest asset management company in the world, sent its yearly letter to CEOs reaffirming its commitment with decarbonizing its assets.  Other financial industries, central banks and regulators around the world are following through.

Mexico´s prime trade and investment partner is committing to a low carbon future while the financial industry is embracing and unprecedented transformation. Oil and gas companies are reinventing its strategies and citizens demand greater responsibility from governments and corporations. Mexico is one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change impacts.

What will its strategy be to manage risk and capitalize the transition?

Article originally published in Reforma news paper.

ENGRAW, a carbon-neutral committed company

ENGRAW contracted ALLCOT Group’s services for the ENGRAW’s 2019 Carbon Footprint report as part of its sustainability strategy.

ENGRAW is a company highly aware of caring for the environment. Its activity consists of processing mulesed-free Uruguayan wool, produced by healthy sheep and following the best livestock available practices. For the 2019 financial year, ENGRAW has decided to calculate its Carbon Footprint for the first time by turning to the expert company in Sustainability Services, ALLCOT Group.

The Carbon Footprint is calculated to know the amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) that are emitted directly or indirectly into the atmosphere as a result of the company’s activity. When referring to the carbon footprint of a company and the emission sources that are analyzed in its calculation, we use the term ‘scope’, classifying it into scope 1, 2 and 3. The scope of the calculation can be more or less ambitious depending on the interests of the company.

ENGRAW, being a company with a strong environmental commitment, has decided to calculate its carbon footprint at the corporate and factory level, covering the 3 scopes as follows:

  • Scope 1: GHG emissions associated with the direct consumption of fossil fuels for the operation of internal machinery, as well as the supply and treatment of water necessary for the development of production: boilers, forklifts, and utility vehicles.
  • Scope 2: indirect GHG emissions associated with the generation of electricity acquired and consumed by ENGRAW facilities. However, as this electricity was generated by its own wind turbines, these emissions were not accounted for.
  • Scope 3: Other indirect emissions such as water consumption and treatment, travel, accommodation, and waste.

On the other hand, ENGRAW has allocated part of its facilities to a tree plantation that is irrigated with treated effluent water from the company’s mill. ALLCOT Group, as an expert developer of climate change mitigation projects, has calculated the total equivalent tons captured from the atmosphere by this plantation, proving that not only does it contribute to the water reuse process, but that the plantation itself acts as a CO2 capture mechanism, mitigating ENGRAW’s environmental impact.

As an objective for 2021, ENGRAW will include in the scope of its next Carbon Footprint report its suppliers of wool raw material. In this way ENGRAW increases its ambition towards its goal of becoming a carbon neutral company.


NOTE FROM FEDERICO RAQUET- Managing Director of Engraw

Last but not least, we applied for the green export award in Uruguay a few weeks ago. Your report was submitted to endorse our environmental impact. Last week we were awarded the prize as the most environmentally friendly large export company in Uruguay. So thank you for your contribution to this achievement that made us very pleased.

Engraw Website.

The key player in the race for decarbonization


Witten by Asier Aramburu, Climate Change RENEN Manager.


In order to effectively advance in reducing the emission of Greenhouse Gases (GHG), the way in which energy is produced and consumed in the world must undergo radical changes. Currently, three quarters of GHG emissions correspond to the energy sector, mainly due to the use of fossil fuels. Although various competitive technologies based on renewable energies have been developed, there are sectors in which their capacity to mitigate GHG is very limited. This fact makes it necessary to develop complementary solutions to decarbonise sectors and applications in which electricity is not cost-efficient, accessible or feasible.

One of the most promising alternatives is based on the large-scale production and use of hydrogen, a gas known and used since the beginning of the industrial era. However, the massive use of this molecule has not been viable until now, thanks to the green hydrogen, the one that is produced through the electrolysis of water. This process is based on the separation of the water molecule into hydrogen and oxygen through the application of electricity from renewable sources. For this reason, production costs are highly dependent on the price of energy. Thus, the massification of renewable energies has allowed the commercial exploitation of this technology to become viable.

On the other hand, it has multiple applications, from domestic natural gas networks to fuel replacement for buses, trucks or ships. Its main advantage: when it burns, it only leaves water steam as a residue. The mechanism is simple: hydrogen reacts with air, generating energy and releasing water.

Attracted by its multiple benefits, an increasing number of countries are betting on its development. Germany is one of the main leaders as it has already committed to invest US $ 10.6 billion to create a local production of green hydrogen. Spain has also joined this race through a National Strategy that seeks to build 4 GW of green hydrogen capacity by 2030.

These efforts will be also supported by the European Post-COVID-19 Recovery Fund that focuses on clean investments, including green hydrogen. This plan is transferred to Spain by using more than 1,500 million euros until 2023 to boost renewable hydrogen.

In Latin America, Chile is leading this development and has just published its National Green Hydrogen Strategy which aims to achieve 5 GW capacity by 2025 (built or developing) and 200 kton/year of production and an installed capacity of 25 GW by 2030.

ALLCOT also wants to lead this sector, so it is actively supporting companies that are developing pilot projects for the production and use of green hydrogen. Due to their innovative nature, these projects require alternative income sources to be able to reach the financial sector. ALLCOT can go hand in hand with these companies so that they can generate carbon credits from GHG emission reductions. Thus, it can be an essential support to enable green hydrogen projects that can then be scalable and replicable.

Thanks to these first projects, progress will be made to get economies of scale that allow reducing costs, encouraging the creation of innovative industrial value chains, promoting technological knowledge and generating sustainable jobs, contributing with all of these to the reactivation of a green high added value economy.

Hydrogen can be a key player in the complete decarbonization of the economy. Its application in sectors where electrification is not cost efficient makes it an extremely competitive technology that has already been included in many NDCs[1]. ALLCOT, as a veteran company in developing climate change mitigation projects, is committed to develop this technology so that its full potential is reached, and progress is made in the fight against climate change and in the achievement of the Development Goals Sustainable (ODS).


[1]Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) are a series of measures and actions which countries that are party to the Paris Agreement plan to take to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to climate change.

The way to Glasgow


Written by Enrique Lendo, Business Development Mexico Advisor.

 


Twenty-twenty marked the beginning in the way to Glasgow, city in the United Kingdom that will host the United Nations Climate Conference in 2021, also known as the 26th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP 26). The Conference was originally scheduled for late 2020 but, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, was postponed until November 2021. The main goal of COP26 is to reach a universal commitment towards “Net Zero” emissions by midcentury.

The way to Glasgow began early in January with an unprecedented leadership from the private sector, which advanced hurriedly towards decarbonization. The World Economic Forum ranked climate change and environmental risk at top of its tables, while BlackRock announced it will stop funding fossil fuel investments. In August, British Petroleum presented its carbon neutrality strategy and ExxonMobil was expelled from the Dow Jones due to its loss of value. City Group announced a $250 billion-dollar green fund and Morgan Stanley disclosed for the first time the carbon footprint of its products. By December, 1,500 companies, with a combined value of $11 trillion dollars, and 30% of the oil industry had committed to Net Zero targets.

Subnational governments and citizens also hasted the pace to join the way to Glasgow. In July, Tamaulipas became the first subnational government in Mexico to put a price on carbon as California committed to banning gasoline vehicles by 2035. In November, the citizens of the United States elected a president who has set the fight against climate change as national priority. By the end of the year, 950 cities and provinces around the world had committed to carbon neutrality, and 74 % of US voters perceived climate change as an important issue to determine their decisions.

National governments arrived late to this race, but they will very likely set the stage in 2021. In September, China surprised the world with its Net Zero target before 2060, followed by Japan and South Korea with similar targets by 2050. In December, the UK and France convened a summit to celebrate the 5th anniversary of the Paris Agreement. By then, 110 countries had announced their intentions to set Net Zero targets by 2050. The US, Mexico and Brazil were not allowed to talk at the summit due to lack of commitment. However, that same day, Joe Biden announced the US will rejoin the Paris Agreement the first day of his administration and he will host his own climate summit in the first 100 days.

With the upcoming commitment form the US, 65% of global emissions will be carbon neutral by midcentury. Russia, India, Indonesia, Brazil and other large emitters will have to be dealt with in order to reach the goal set for Glasgow. Their commitment will depend on convincing them that environmental degradation does not constitute a political agenda but a demonstrated fact with increasing human and physical impacts. In 2021, there will be more floods like the one in Tabasco and more wildfires like the ones in California, and another $ 1.5 billion dollars’ worth of climate related impacts worldwide pushing the risk further up in capital markets.

The good news is that these markets are already responding by punishing dirty investments. In 2021, for the first time in history, investments in clean energy will overtake these of fossil fuels and by 2024 there will be more renewable energy installed capacity. Post-COVID economic recovery provides us with the opportunity to build back better, meet the Paris Agreement targets, propel investment, and create millions of new jobs.

In 2021, the way to Glasgow will continue. Committed countries will increase the pressure on polluting countries through diplomacy and trade sanctions. Capital markets will further decarbonize their portfolios. Citizen will demand politicians to enhance their commitment and subnational governments will reinforce their leadership.

what will you do in the way to Glasgow?

Article originally published in Reforma news paper

Veloce Racing becomes first Extreme E team to commit to net-zero carbon target as it joins forces with ALLCOT Group

  • Veloce Racing leading the net-zero carbon charge in pioneering all-electric off-road series.
  • Team aiming to drive change in motorsport industry by joining forces with sustainability solutions provider.
  • ALLCOT to measure and help offset all of team’s pre and in-season carbon production.

Strengthening its resolve to lead the way both on and off the track during the inaugural campaign of Extreme E next year, Veloce Racing has become the first of the innovative electric off-road series’ teams to announce a carbon offset partner, after reaching an agreement with ALLCOT Group.

ALLCOT is a global authority in carbon-offsetting and sustainability initiatives, and teamed up with Extreme E in September with the goal of achieving a net-zero carbon footprint by the end of the championship’s first season.

With environmental sustainability at the very heart of Veloce Racing’s core values – as one of the London-based outfit’s four main pillars, alongside gender equality, automotive electrification and engaging new audiences through esports – the team was eager to make a similar commitment and is the first Extreme E entrant to take this significant step.

The agreement will see ALLCOT measure and help Veloce Racing to offset all of the carbon produced from the moment that the team signed up to compete in Extreme E in September, 2019 – covering the full build-up to the series’ maiden campaign as well as the entire season of racing next year.

Veloce Racing is firmly focussed on its net-zero carbon objective stretching into 2021 and beyond, and in ALLCOT, the team has the perfect partner. The organisation’s tireless work to reduce carbon emissions directly supports the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, which call upon governments, businesses and communities to protect the planet and put an end to poverty.

In addition to its carbon offset pledge, Veloce Racing’s sustainability credentials will be further enhanced by Extreme E’s environmental ethos. All competing cars will be 100% electric, zero-emission vehicle charging will use Hydrogen Fuel Cells generated by water and solar energy, limited team numbers will be permitted on-event and all freight and logistics will be transported to race locations by boat, which it is estimated will reduce carbon by two-thirds in comparison with air travel.

Daniel Bailey, CEO, Veloce Racing, commented:

“Partnering with ALLCOT Group is a significant moment in Veloce Racing’s journey. Ever since our organisation was founded, we have prided ourselves on being pioneers and leading the way amongst our peers – and sustainability has always been one of our three core pillars.

ALLCOT Group’s philosophy perfectly matches our own, and offsetting all of our carbon emissions from the moment we joined Extreme E over a year ago is a key element of our participation in this unique championship. We are fully committed to playing our part in the preservation of our planet – and we look forward to working closely with ALLCOT Group to achieve our net-zero carbon objective.”

Alexis Leroy, CEO, ALLCOT Group, commented:

“This landmark partnership with Veloce Racing is a great opportunity to open the path to sustainability leadership not only with Extreme E but also with its main stakeholders, the teams.

“We welcome Veloce Racing’s leadership and look forward to showcasing impacts compensation beyond greenhouse gas. Working hand-in-hand with Veloce Racing in that respect will allow us to send a strong message within the world of motorsport as we hope this initiative will build traction among its peers.”

The 2021 Extreme E season is set to begin in Al-Ula, Saudi Arabia (20-21 March) before moving on to Dakar, Senegal (29-30 May), Kangerlussuaq, Greenland (28-29 August), Para, Brazil (23-24 October) and Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina (11-12 December).

About Veloce:

Veloce is a London-based organisation that focusses on disruptive areas of the sports and entertainment industries – specifically, esports and sustainable, EV motorsport. The brand comprises established professional gaming organisation, Veloce Esports and Extreme E outfit, Veloce Racing with both teams falling under the overarching Veloce umbrella. As a whole, the business occupies the fastest-growing sectors in motorsport.

Veloce Racing was born from Extreme E’s vision of sustainability-focussed, content-rich and gender-equal sport. The team’s remarkable leadership line-up is spearheaded by legendary Formula 1 designer Adrian Newey and Formula E Champion and ex-Formula 1 driver Jean-Éric Vergne. They are joined by a host of other industry entrepreneurs and innovators who are eagerly awaiting the start of the inaugural 2021 season. Extreme E is an innovative new motorsport championship that sees electric SUVs going head-to-head in areas of the world that have been damaged by climate change or environmental issues.

The Veloce Esports’ driver stable includes many high-profile drivers, influencers and teams from across the globe. Among them are the official McLaren Racing, Alfa Romeo, Sauber and YAS HEAT esports programmes as well as YouTube sensations Tiametmarduk, Aarava, Xpertgamingtech and Lando Norris’ Quadrant channel to name but a few. The organisation’s digital broadcast network, across its various channels, generates in excess of 130 million views per month.

About ALLCOT:

ALLCOT is a veteran project developer offering knowledge, expertise, and management to initiatives that reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to actively combat the climate crisis under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement is aligned with the 2030 Agenda and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

ALLCOT is a leading actor in the climate and sustainability impact markets and is recognized as one of the established companies in the sector that has been building a strong reputation in environmental project development and the development of corporate sustainability services in their home and emerging markets.  Developing their own emission reduction projects, ALLCOT supports companies and public bodies to improve their sustainability performance by offering consulting services under various carbon quantification standards (CDM, VCS, GS) and for various sectors (forestry, waste, renewable energy, transport, sports) covering the entire carbon credit value chain for its later management in the markets created under the Paris Agreement.

 

Tabasco and Biden


Written by Enrique Lendo, Business Development Mexico Advisor.

 


While the results in Gorgia and Arizona secured Joe Biden´s Victory, Tabasco faces the worst flooding in its history and uncertainty regarding potential support to rebuild it´s towns and economy. What happened in the states of Tabasco, Chiapas and Veracruz in the past days is not the result of atypical rain but a direct consequence of Mexico´s vulnerability to climate change. It is ironic to confirm that being Mexico an oil country, climate change is now collecting the bill.

According to Mexico´s Natural Disasters Trust Fund (FONDEN), 91% of the monies spent in disaster relief between 1999 and 2017 went to climate related events. Climate vulnerability is based on geographic and physical factors, but lack of urban planning and a culture of prevention, as well as weak capacities to reduce and manage the crisis, exacerbates the impacts. The economic cost of hurricanes and heavy rain events between 2002 and 2015 amounted to 18 billion dollars; while the flooding from last week surpassed 200 thousand people affected and 50 thousand homes damaged.

Mexico contributes with less than 2% to greenhouse gases global emissions. However, given our condition of highly vulnerable country it is imperative to flag that we are being part of the solution. What happens in other countries, especially high emitters, is particularly important. Joe Biden´s victory is a cause for celebration because it confirms the strategy that will drive the world towards decarbonization through green economic growth.

Never on the history, a president elect had such a clear environmental mandate. According to one exit poll, 74% of Biden´s voters considered climate change as especially important for its choice. Other poll concluded that 67% of all voters, not just Biden supporters, are in favor of increasing public investment in clean and renewable energy.

It is in this context that Biden proposes a “Green Deal” that will take the US to reach carbon neutrality in 2050 and its electricity sector to become 100% clean by 2035. In order to reach such goal, they will invest $2 trillion dollars of public funds that will leverage $5 additional trillions from the private sector and subnational governments; and also create 10 million new jobs. They will rejoin the Paris Agreement and consider trade sanctions to polluting countries.

After the electoral results in the US, there is no doubt that the preferences of citizens, consumers and investors are leaning towards decarbonization and green growth. A few days before the elections, China, Japan and South Korea joined the European Union with net zero emission targets by midcentury. With a similar target about to be announced in the US, 60% of the global emissions will be neutral by 2050. In the private sector the story is not too different, the value of oil and gas companies within the S&P 500 has gone from 15 to less than 3% over the last decade, predicting its eminent extinction.

With the US as its main trading partner, opportunities to develop Mexico´s low carbon potential are greater than ever. From investing in clean energy production to supply national and binational electricity markets, to manufacturing of goods and technology to service the growing demand of renewable energy, to propelling carbon emission offsets in the forest and agricultural sectors, possibilities are unlimited. Mexico is on the verge of the conditions that will define its future.

Article originally published in Reforma news paper.

Climate Change and Politics


Written by Enrique Lendo, Business Development Mexico Advisor.


The United States of America (US) is the second largest emitter of greenhouse gases after China. In 2018, it emitted 5.41 giga tones, contributing to 15% of global emissions. However, the relevance of the US is not limited to its emissions, it also has strategic roles in international negotiations, production and global trade, innovation, and capital markets. Had the US not come to an agreement with China in 2015, we might not have a Paris Agreement today.

It is for that reason that the Thump’s administration announcement to leave the Paris Agreement hindered the trust of contracting parties and worried many for the potential measures that the US would take at the national level with regards to climate change. Under the arguments of energy sovereignty and employment protection, the Trump´s administration has stood out for questioning climate science, reverting dozens of environmental laws and promoting oil and gas exploitation in public lands.

Despite being the largest economy in the world, the US is highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. This year is expected to be the warmest in the history of the country and the state of California is currently experiencing a record intensity of wildfires with over 3.4 million acres affected, equivalent to 3% of its surface. Some weeks before, Huracan Laura left 25 billion worth of damages in southern US.

Increasingly, north Americans have become more sensitive to climate change and, even conservatives, are beginning to link some of the impacts in their surroundings with this global phenomenon. Two-thirds of U.S. adults say the federal government is doing too little to reduce the effects of global climate change and 64% say protecting the environment and dealing with global climate change should be top priorities for the president and Congress. Hence, climate change will have a more significant role in the upcoming presidential elections than in previous ones.

In order to set the path towards carbon neutrality in 2050, Joe Biden proposes to invest $1.7 trillion dollars in clean energy while creating 500 thousand new jobs. He has also promise to rejoin the Paris Agreement and to set a carbon tax in the US. While the Republicans´ proposal is ambiguous, they have realized that addressing climate change might look appealing to new generations and some private sector industries. It is for this reason that the Trump administration has proposed to plant a trillion trees and increase investment in carbon capture and storage without harming the fossil fuel industry.

Surprisingly, last week the Commodity Futures Trading Commission released the report “Managing Climate Risk in the Financial System” with concrete recommendations to measure, report and mitigate climate change risk. The announcement is worth noting for being the first time that a federal government appointed commission openly recognizes that climate change poses a systemic risk to the US financial markets.

As citizens, we have three options to influences decision making towards green and sustainable economic growth. On one hand, we can influence companies to produce sustainable goods and services through our purchasing power. On the other hand, we can propel capital markets by investing in low environmental impact funds. But the option with the greatest potential of influence rests on electoral processes.  The US presidential elections this coming November will define, among other things, the impact of that country to the global environment and the possibility to transit towards a low carbon global economy. I wander when will Mexico be ready place the environment among the top priorities within our political decisions.

Article originaly publised in Reforma news paper.