EXTREME E TEAMS UP WITH ALLCOT GROUP TO SUPPORT NET-ZERO CARBON GOAL

Extreme E, the revolutionary electric off-road racing series, has agreed a partnership with ALLCOT to offset the championship’s carbon footprint in support of its goal to have a net-zero carbon footprint by the end of its first season.

ALLCOT, a world-leader in carbon offsetting and sustainability initiatives, develops innovative impact projects which enable businesses to support local communities to protect the environment by reducing their carbon emissions. These initiatives directly support the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, which call on governments, businesses and communities to put an end to poverty and protect the planet

Alejandro Agag, Founder and CEO at Extreme E commented: “Our sustainability strategy is a crucial aspect of Extreme E so we’re delighted to be working with ALLCOT, a world-leader in climate change and sustainable solutions, to develop this strategy and enable us to support some truly transformational projects.

“Extreme E’s goal is to have a zero-net carbon footprint by the end of its first season, which means removing as many emissions as we produce. We plan to achieve this by following the United Nation’s framework which recommends reducing, measuring, and offsetting carbon emissions. The projects we will support will empower local communities to reduce emissions to help protect the planet, not just now but for the long-term.”

ALLCOT global community projects include the Brazilian Rosewood Protected Forest Project that safeguards 177,899 hectares of high conservation value rainforest, and a project in Mozambique that will replace 10,000 traditional cookstoves with new energy-efficient versions, reducing charcoal consumption by 50 per cent and in turn reducing gas emissions and usage of fossil fuels.

Alexis L. Leroy, Founder and CEO of ALLCOT, commented: “We are very excited to partner with Extreme E not simply with offset but with vanguard vision in term of sustainable strategy solutions, shifting from GHG compensations to Global Impacts, which is at the core of Extreme E’s values. Beyond, we see great potential in synergy with Extreme E and its technology partners to bring sustainable innovative solutions to remote communities.”

Extreme E is consulting with carbon measurement experts Quantis to calculate its corporate footprint and will continue to track and update this figure as its season unfolds.

As well as offsetting, Extreme E focuses on reduction of its footprint through a series of efforts which include;

  • Using 100% electric vehicles.
  • Zero emission vehicle charging using Hydrogen Fuel Cells generated by water and solar.
  • The series centrepiece, the RMS St. Helena ship, which has undergone extensive refurbishment to lower its emissions in order to transport the championship’s freight and logistics around the world. This is estimated to reduce carbon by two thirds in comparison with air freight.
  • Not having spectators at events. (Depending on the type and location of events, fans can represent 20 to 50% of the total footprint of an event once you consider their transport, food and beverage and merchandising).
  • Capping the number of members each team has on-site to just seven each – two drivers, one engineer and four mechanics.
  • Remote broadcast operations which involves using satellites to enable live editing and overlays to take place in a London studio.
  • The use of alternative fuel HVO (hydrogenated vegetable oil) generators instead of diesel counterparts for all on-site power needs.
  • Virtual, at-home hospitality experiences.

In addition to reducing, measuring and offsetting its carbon footprint, Extreme E has appointed an independent Scientific Committee, consisting of leading academics from The University of Oxford and The University of Cambridge, tasked with driving the series’ climate education and practice.

Extreme E will go racing in early 2021, visiting five environments around the world, including Arctic, desert, ocean, glacier and Amazon locations, which have already been damaged or affected by climate and environmental issues.

Inspiring its global audience to take action now, and leaving a lasting positive impact is a key element of the series, and working with organisations like ALLCOT ensures Extreme E is supporting and investing in the right projects with the biggest impact on the environment and its local communities.

Extreme E will use the mass appeal and following of sport to highlight the effects of climate change around the world, which include deforestation, melting icecaps, desertification, rising sea levels, plastic pollution and more, and will educate its fans with important messages around the reduction of our own carbon impact, including the promotion of electric vehicles and other clean energy mobility solutions for a lower carbon future.

To learn more about Extreme E, visit – www.Extreme-E.com

 NOTES TO EDITORS

About ALLCOT:

ALLCOT is a veteran project developer offering knowledge, expertise, and management to initiatives that reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to actively combat the climate crisis under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement is aligned with the 2030 Agenda and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

ALLCOT is a leading actor in the climate and sustainability impact markets and is recognized as one of the established companies in the sector that has been building a strong reputation in environmental project development and the development of corporate sustainability services in their home and emerging markets.  Developing their own emission reduction projects, ALLCOT supports companies and public bodies to improve their sustainability performance by offering consulting services under various carbon quantification standards (CDM, VCS, GS) and for various sectors (forestry, waste, renewable energy, transport, sports) covering the entire carbon credit value chain for its later management in the markets created under the Paris Agreement.

About Extreme E:

Extreme E is a radical new racing series, which will see electric SUVs competing in extreme environments around the world which have already been damaged or affected by climate and environmental issues. The five-race global voyage highlights the impact of climate change and human interference in some of the world’s most remote locations and promotes the adoption of electric vehicles to help preserve the environment and protect the planet.

Another unique feature of Extreme E is its floating garage, the RMS St. Helena. The former Royal Mail cargo-passenger vessel is undergoing a modernisation and refit in order to lower its emissions. It will be used to transport the championship’s freight and infrastructure, including vehicles, to the nearest port, minimising Extreme E’s footprint as well as being used to facilitate scientific research through an on-board laboratory.

Extreme E is operated in association with Formula E – the organiser of the ABB FIA Formula E Championship. Extreme E is committed to sustainability and minimising environmental impact – as well as playing its part in re-building and restoring areas already impacted by climate change.

ALLCOT and Green Tank, an alliance to promote sustainability and a low-carbon economy in Mexico.

The two companies join forces to support organizations in achieving sustainable and non-polluting business models. The alliance aims to respond to current needs of the Mexican market and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations.

From the time of the launch of Agenda 21 and, more recently, the Agenda 2030, Mexico has actively voiced her commitment to sustainable development and to strengthening the channels for monitoring, communicating and regulating actions that have allowed us to reduce the gap between the high indices of inequality and the high indices of pollution of the 1980s up to the second decade of the 21st century. Undoubtedly, the COVID 19 pandemic of 2020 marks a turning point—not only in Mexico—that calls for being even more rigorous and exhaustive in complying with sustainability goals. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) take on greater relevance and emphasize the right path for humanity and the planet.  

Mexico became a signatory to the Agenda 2030 and the Paris Climate Agreement and included their objectives in national planning through passing reforms to the legal framework and prioritizing those goals in the development strategies. Green House Gas Emissions (GHG) are to be reduced by 22% in 2030 and by 50% by 2050, and the national contribution to the Paris Agreement is being updated to reflect a vision of net zero emissions by mid-century.

To meet its climate mitigation objectives, Mexico established a carbon tax in 2014 and, with its launch of a carbon trading system in 2023, will become the first Latin American country to set a ceiling on emissions through efficiency schemes that promote competitiveness in sustainability. In addition, in 2020 Mexico presented its National Strategy for Implementation of the Agenda 2030 including concrete action plans for achieving each of the 17 SDGs and putting people in the center of the development program under the slogan, “No One Left Behind”.

In response to these priorities, ALLCOT and Green Tank, after many years of promoting sustainability with different approaches, draw closer to combine efforts and advance toward a shared purpose. Today, our goal of promoting compliance with the SDGs and protecting the planet’s resources is intensified, but above all, we strive together to generate prosperity, shared value and promote better living conditions in communities.

ALLCOT, with more than 10 years of experience, develops sustainable projects around the world, supporting its clients and collaborators with know-how and management of initiatives that fulfill the Sustainable Development Goals and actively combat the climate crisis by reducing emissions of Greenhouse Gases (GHG). Since 2017, ALLCOT began operations in Mexico aimed at breaking paradigms in the private and public sectors by promoting vigorous efforts to reduce greenhouse gases through adopting sustainable projects designed to produce social impacts. Also, we have served as a spokesperson for the SDGs with leaders in banking, industry, waste management, construction, tourism and academia. ALLCOT is committed to and forms alliances with companies that, like us, value the environment.

The Green Tank team applies its extensive international experience and multi-disciplinary backgrounds to support businesses as change agents that protect the environment to foster successful and regenerative economies. Green Tank offers strategy, management and communication of projects and products that favor the planet and apply the Triple Impact approach. Our consultancy works to create shared value through collaborative models that stimulate cooperation among businesses and exchange of products or services between Large Businesses and Small and Medium Enterprises for achieving energy efficiency and the circular economy. Green Tank consulting services enable businesses to develop business strategies and measure and comply with the SDGs of the Agenda 2030, and the firm is committed to the movement of B Corps.

ALLCOT and Green Tank merge their pathways and combine tools to pursue a single vision of forming sustainable alliances to promote a sustainable and low-carbon economy and, why not?, to advance towards a carbon-neutral economy motivated by promoting the well-being of the people, communities and organizations where we leave our marks.

Hyper-complexity in the management of sustainable projects


Written by Nicol Garzón, Project Manager Coordinator.


The management of sustainable projects in a territory deserves a careful understanding of the complexity of its systems. Multiple interacting systems, composed of different variables and their relationships, converge on the territory, thus defining nodes of hyper-complexity. These nodes can be carefully managed from the collective expertise and ability to recognize the structural variables and asking the right questions before launching a response.

At the different levels of a territory, there are diverse complexities such as social, ecological, geological, edaphological, hydric, and atmospheric complexities, among many others.  These are not simple chapters of environmental impact studies (to give an example) to be presented to environmental authorities; they are a classification that allows us to understand the numerous list of variables that play a part in each territorial system. Additionally, if we add the fact that they are interconnected and are not an exclusive part of a specific classification, we are made aware of the complexity of understanding and working for the territories.

In our industry we have been inclined at different times, to provide simplistic answers for the territory, that spawn from our understanding of urban areas, without pausing to recognize the hyper-complexity of the territory and its issues, and from there, effectively add value to the territory. As humanity, despite the complexity of our thought processes, we usually use filters and lenses that simplify a territory into a handful of variables depending on the interest of the project, given the restrictions of the system: —usually— budget and time.

Faced with this critical scenario of project management in a territory, from an academic standpoint, and with the aim of recognizing the restrictions of entry, as well as the value of the territory, professionals have been investing without fear, in complex solutions for complex situations.

Interdisciplinary studies, a global understanding of projects —with all macro variables and interconnections—, the identification of the structural variables (that lesser number of variables that have an impact on a greater number of variables), and the differentiation between slow variables and fast variables, are usually heavily invested on. This investment is what allows ALLCOT to have a solid, concrete, understanding of the territorial dynamics.

It is in this scenario of a tongue-twisting language, that the purpose of ALLCOT goes beyond the design of environmental projects, by offering complex solutions to complex situations, which connect the territory and its expectations with market requirements.

ALLCOT maintains its focus on the results that add sustainable value to the territories, but recognizes and takes into account the different structural variables according to the territorial dynamics.

To our Project Managers, ALLCOT’s Project management is not a replicable formula; it is a continuous recognition of the uniqueness of each territory, and its challenges, its changing environments, and of high uncertainty. Projects in ALLCOT do not follow a linear logic, but on the contrary respond to the dynamics of change, to the adaptive processes, to the flows of social and ecological resilience and noticeably to market requirements.

Different countries of the world, including governments in Latin America and the Caribbean since 2015, have incorporated sustainable development goals, and the fulfilment of the goals of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change in their agendas, which has encouraged development of policies, programmes and projects in the territory, that either end up in a “picture-perfect result”, or go beyond, by adding collective value. It is here where managers who close the gap between policy and management, after investing in crafting the right questions, can make sustainable development projects a reality, by recognizing the limits imposed by nature, and achieving social prosperity, under the understanding of territorial complexities.

ALLCOTooNS and SDG #2: What do the children think of the SDG #5: Gender Equality?

A few months ago we launched the ALLCOTooNS project and today we announce the second edition of this contest, which seeks to encourage children to get involved in the Sustainable Development Goals- SDG, the 17 goals set by the United Nations for the 2030 Agenda. In this opportunity, we wanted to hear the children’s perspective on the SDG #5: Gender Equality, one of the central themes of the current public debate, and which is still reflected in worrying figures such as the 132 million girls who do not have access to education worldwide.

It is crucial that children are involved in the conversation. This is why our aim at ALLCOT is to bring them up with questions that allow them to be critical of the reality they face every day, and above all, to be aware that they can take sides: it is the daily actions that build change. With this purpose, we carried out the 2nd ALLCOTooNS FORUM, where we could talk to some of the participants and listen to how they live the gender issue in their daily lives, a space of encounter that acquires a special value in the midst of the isolation that we all face due to the COVID pandemic19.

Talking with the participants, we found that the boys and girls are very aware of their context, have very clear references of women who have been pioneers – like Malala Yousafzai, to name one example – and also know that the work to achieve gender equality and to guarantee that all voices are heard is a task that is built by all of us. Without further due, we leave you with the works of art in which the little ones have shaped their vision, so that they can speak for themselves:

Natalia López  Valeria López
Diego Muñoz García Inés Muñoz García
Gabriela 
Diego Frowein

 

SDG #5 – 2nd round: Winners

Our Ethics Committee, chaired by Mr. Van Kirk Reeves, has delivered that the winners of this first contest are:

  • Category under 10 years old: Diego Muñoz
  • Category over 10 years old: Gabriela  

 

 

 

                    

 

 

The SDG index, a Tool for a more Accurate Monitoring of Sustainable Development in Latin America


Written by Andrés Melendro, Sustainability Manager


Last Wednesday, June 16th, the Center for Sustainable Development for Latin America (CODS) launched its SDG Index: a measure of the progress of Latin American and Caribbean countries towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The report highlights that, overall, the region is not meeting the goals set forth in the 2030 Agenda, and that the health and economic crisis linked to the COVID-19 pandemic also represents a considerable setback in most of the SDGs. If the current trend continues, the goals set in 2015 would not materialize even on a 50-year horizon.

SDG 13, Climate Action, stands out as an exception because widespread quarantines and restrictions on production have led to a considerable drop in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, the rebound effect is foreseeable since the reduction is circumstantial. In particular, it is possible that the interest of investing in sustainable projects and green technologies gets delayed by the haste to reactivate or protect sectors of greater importance for the immediate future of a company. In this sense, ALLCOT’s work to develop projects that generate financial incentives to reduce emissions is more relevant than ever.

The methodology advanced by the CODS is based on the one that the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) has been using for several years worldwide to establish international comparisons. The CODS adjusts it to the statistical reality of the countries of the region, given the unavailability of many indicators. In this way, the comparison becomes more valid. In some cases, for some States, there is no available methodology for SDG measurement. Another issue is the lack of data: the index requires figures ex-ante and ex-post 2015 to measure progress since the creation of the 2030 Agenda.

The report also includes a visualization tool called the dashboard. This allows to highlight, through a traffic light code, how close an SDG is to being fulfilled, in order to serve as a prioritization tool in each country.

The publication of the SDG Index, as well as the creation of the municipal SDG indexes in Colombia cities by the Corona Foundation through its network tracking cities’ wellbeing, illustrate the trend towards the appropriation of the SDGs by non-governmental entities and their measurement at sub-national scales. The private sector, and in particular organizations setting standards for corporate sustainability reports, have also included the SDGs in their performance metrics. Precisely, ALLCOT is currently developing statistical tools to quantify the impact of the socioeconomic co-benefits of its climate change mitigation projects, through the 230 indicators associated with the 17 SDGs.

This exercise presents several challenges, given that the project areas tend to be smaller than local political-administrative divisions in the country where the project is developed and usually do not coincide with their geographical limits. ALLCOT, like the CODS, adapts the SDG indicators to the real data availability and to variables that make more sense depending on the specific context. In addition, to mitigate the absence of local data in many rural areas of developing countries, ALLCOT has created mechanisms for collecting primary data to establish a meaningful SDG baseline. In this way, ALLCOT takes a leadership role in measuring corporate impact on sustainable development.

Cookstove Project: Alternatives that benefit the community and the environment.


 Written by Natalia Rodrigo, Head of Group Business Development


Air pollution impacts from cooking comprising wood-based fuel and charcoal represent 2% of GHG global emissions. This wood-based fuel comes from unsustainable and uncontrolled harvesting practices, which lead to forest degradation and its sub consequent loss of carbon sequestration capacity. In addition, forest degradation is related directly to soil erosion, soil and water pollution, flood risk increase, and biodiversity loss, among others.

It has been reported that nearly 3 billion people make use of this type of household cooking process, mainly located in the least developed countries (LDCs). Apart from the damage to nature and environment protection, this traditional household cooking practice also implies tangible impacts on public health.

As a result, aimed at the urgency of trying to change this dramatic situation, local initiatives have been created. These strategies are supported by international alliances and investors, which promote the gradual substitution of wood-based fuel and charcoal stoves to more efficient devices, enabling to reduce from 30 to 90% the CO2 emissions which are resulted from household cooking. The reduction rate depends, of course, on the technology and type of fuel used by the stove.

Mitigating climate change and environmental degradation require an inclusive industry that makes clean cooking accessible to the three billion people who live without it. From ALLCOT, we develop and support energy demand projects based on the efficiency improvement of traditional household cooking stoves.

All in all, efficient cookstoves projects foster not only GHG reductions but also nurture sustainable development among local communities by advocating the integration of the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). With this cookstove delivery project, we can impact 10 different SDG at once:

SDG 3 Good health & Well-being: Efficient cookstove projects eliminate the black carbon resulted from traditional devices, promoting decrease rates on respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases.

SDG 4 Quality Education: Efficient cookstove projects compose an educational strategy based on operation and maintenance as well as environmental and H&S (Health and Safety) awareness.

SDG 5 Gender Equality: Women are empowered across the implementation of these projects due to the fact of their leadership on the educational strategy.

SDG 6 Clean Water and sanitation: Awareness programs across local communities in terms of the importance of boiling water to prevent gastrointestinal diseases.

SDG 7 Affordable & Clean Energy: Improved cookstoves are based on long-term use devices, boosting effective fuel consumption, implying tangible money-saving across local communities.

SDG 9 Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure: An inclusive industry, based on R&D and improvement of infrastructure, is created across efficient cookstove projects.

SDG 10 Reduce inequalities: Improved cookstoves are based on an affordable price, which encourages local communities to acquire this technology.

SDG 13 Climate Action: Efficient cookstoves projects enable us to reduce from 30 to 90% of the CO2 emissions which are resulted from traditional household cooking devices.

SDG 15 Life on land: Efficient cookstoves projects promote the effective fight against forest degradation and biodiversity loss.

SDG 17 Partnership for the goals: An inclusive industry as well as worldwide institutional alliances are created across cookstove projects.

This project is an example of the effectiveness of cross-cutting projects, which, through concrete action manage to address several issues. For this reason, ALLCOT continues to be committed to this type of action that represents a long-term benefit for both the community and the environment.

#SDG17 ALLCOT involves the little ones through “ALLCOTooNS and the SDGs”

 

The COVID-19 in a matter of weeks transformed our entire world. Daily routines and everything we took for granted, like being able to go outside or hug a friend, are becoming distant scenarios. However, this moment of confinement provides alternative spaces of reflection and encounter, with others and with ourselves.

The crisis unleashed by the COVID-19 has led us to rethink the entire economy and the existing work dynamics. Without a doubt, one of the greatest challenges is to maintain productivity and effectiveness at work, despite social distancing. For ALLCOT, the safety and welfare of our workers is a priority, so we follow the instructions given by the authorities and support from day one in the form of telecommuting. This way, our employees can continue to carry out their work from the comfort of their homes, thus balancing their personal and professional lives.

ALLCOT creates spaces to share with its employees

Since the beginning of this situation, we wanted to keep close to our workers and technology has become our best ally to achieve this. However, distance has never been an obstacle for us because the ALLCOT team is located around the world: Colombia, Mexico, France, Senegal, Spain, Guatemala, among others.  Considering this, we launched our monthly FORUM, a meeting space that allows us to relate to all workers, tell our stories, and, of course, catch up on the current state of the company. This reaffirms the reliability of ALLCOT, which in the midst of the crisis continues to operate at 100% of its capacity and in continuous growth.

These moments have enabled the construction of new spaces, and we wanted the families of our employees to be part of our daily battle for the environment.  This is how ALLCOTooNS was born, a diverse space where children could express their ideas, get to know each other, and share with the people in our organization.

ALLCOTooNS and the SDGs

Therefore, we have created “ALLCOTooNS and the SDGs”, a contest in which children can create from a craft, drawing or any object, what each SDG represents for them, and what actions could be taken to achieve it. ALLCOT Ethics Committee will be in charge of evaluating and informing the winners, who will receive an honorable mention and a bonus with which they must perform a small action in benefit of the SDG proposed. This competition is divided into two categories: under 10 years and over 10 years.

#SDG13 – 1st round: Artists and their Works

On this occasion, the first category chosen was SDG 13 “Climate Action”. Below, we present the artists and their works of art:

Francisco Cabrejo

Heronimo Pombo

Valentina

Raphael Leroy

Valentina Lopez

Diego Muñoz

Gabriela

Luisa de Brigard

Ines Muñoz

#SDG13 – 1st round: Winners

Our Ethics Committee, chaired by Mr. Van Kirk Reeves, has delivered that the winners of this first contest are:

  • Category under 10 years old: Inés Muñoz
  • Category over 10 years old: Diego Frowein 

Congratulations! 

A Green Restart for the World


Written by Alexis Leroy, CEO ALLCOT


The coronavirus pandemic has been a huge wake-up call for the world. In one short month, large swathes of the economy have either closed or been forced to scale back significantly. Air travel is virtually non-existent, private transport has shrunk to a shadow of its former self, and retail has almost entirely closed its doors.

And while we have been self-isolating at home, it’s given us all a chance to consider what we’re giving up, what choices we can’t make, and even whether we’d choose the same things again whenever restrictions are lifted. The lockdown has also turned into a fountain of ideas; ideas on how we can take this opportunity to rebuild our economies in a more sustainable way.

To be fair, some blueprints for a sustainable future are already on the table. In the US, the Green New Deal harkened back to President Roosevelt’s plan to bring the country back from the Great Depression of the 1920s. The 21st century version focused on climate change, the biggest challenge of our times, as well as social and economic inequality.

In Europe, the newly-elected Commission brought forward its own Green Deal last year, which is even more ambitious than its US counterpart. The EU plan seeks to turn the bloc’s entire economy upside down, refocusing on sustainability, climate, transitional measures to diversify and modernize the economy and offer opportunities for all. The proposals on both sides of the Atlantic are fortunate in their timing, as we grapple with “the fastest, deepest economic shock in history”. A lot of thinking has already been done.

For Asia, too, the pandemic represents an opportunity to embark upon the same shift, away from mimicking the West and towards a more sustainable, self-reliant economic model. Indeed, it may be the east’s only hope, if the kind of proposals that we read today are put into action elsewhere.

The liberal market-based economic model has been around for around 300 years. Globalization was the last great leap forward for the neoliberal interpretation, and coronavirus’ rapid expansion around the world is the warning that we cannot continue as we have done. The economy that evolved in the 18th century took the world as it saw it. It did not experience, as we do today, the immense impact of industry and business on our earth and our climate. 

Pollution and resource scarcity were not considered problems 300 years ago, and all our efforts since then have been too modest, too piecemeal, and have been largely shrugged aside by the interests of old-world business models.

Yet today, we understand how our economic model impacts our health, our well-being. We can quantify the harmful effects of air pollution, just as we can quantify the cost of natural disasters.

With all this knowledge and understanding, gained through the immense technological advances of just the last 50 years, we have an opportunity to set a new course for the coming decades.

What must be done?

At a macroeconomic level, the world needs to commit, again and with greater force, to the purpose of the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals. We need governments to line up behind these aims, to make pledges that are ambitious, believable and achievable, and develop the pathway towards achieving the ultimate prize.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have a simple target: “a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future. They consist of 17 ambitions including reducing inequality, clean water and sanitation, climate action, responsible consumption and production, and zero hunger. All of these goals can be achieved with a thoughtful approach to re-building our shared economy.

And thanks to technology and understanding, progress towards the SDGs can now be quantified. Health, education, economic opportunity, stable societies, and even gender equality can be measured and assessed. And this quantification of achievement can now be rewarded. For the first time in our economic history, intangible impacts are now becoming tangible items on balance sheets. Efforts such as the Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosure are slowly moving the needle on bringing externalities like greenhouse gases into the realm of real costs. And in the same way, improving our collective health, safety and prosperity can also be rewarded, in lower external costs (like carbon emissions and businesses losses) as well as in lower human costs.

The Paris Agreement has one, just one, simple goal: to ensure that by the middle of the century all our emissions of greenhouse gases are balanced by sinks that absorb those same gases. Again, this is a target that we can achieve if we plan carefully and put in the work, the investment, and the research to make it happen.

What will we gain? We will begin to return our climate to a state where catastrophic weather events are not “normal”, where deforestation does not rob peoples and species of their home, where water stress does not force mass migrations.

At a national or even multinational level, how can we make the changes that the future requires of us?

A Green Rebuilding

As we eventually emerge from the shadow of Covid-19, economies will need government help to re-start. Already we have seen billions of dollars, or euros, of pounds, spent to assist businesses and people to get through the lockdown. And we will see billions more spent to assist businesses to rebuild and restart their operations. We should make sure that we do not focus on short-term survival but on long term sustainability.

While we defend the independence of the private sector, when it comes to receiving publicly-financed assistance, the private sector should be required to follow public policy. Instead of spending 90% of the assistance on propping up existing business models, shouldn’t our leaders be looking at making our economy more resilient?

Financial assistance should come with conditions. Industrial companies should be required to make improvements and changes to their processes that match the SDGs. Where a factory now buys power from a gas-fired plant, any government assistance should require that it buys renewable power – a simple and achievable solution that comes at no additional cost.

Manufacturers should be required to use recyclable packaging, ensure the products are recyclable or reusable, and that their processes are as clean as possible. Regulations could be stiffened to require those producers to take legal responsibility for all lifetime waste associated with their products.

Commercial businesses should re-examine their practices and see what flexibility they can build into their operations. During the pandemic, we have seen an explosion in the use of video conferencing to maintain social links. Millions of people have been working effectively from home, rather than commuting to offices. Do we all, as employers *and* employees, need to commute to offices that use even more resources?

Instead of global supply chains, the business should be encouraged to look locally for materials and supplies, thereby reducing transportation emissions and pollution, and supporting the local community and its economy. And do we need to travel quite so much for business or for pleasure? There already is a growing awareness of the impact our travel habits have on the environment and climate, but the recovery from this global shutdown offers a real opportunity to wean ourselves off needless travel. 

Personal Greening

Lastly, how can you and I as individuals translate these goals into action on the ground? 

As consumers, we can make more responsible choices and look after our outputs. When we buy, we should buy responsibly: are products reusable, recyclable and re-purposeable? Do our products even need packaging?

When we do consume, are we consuming more than we need? Are the electricity, gas, and resources that we use going from renewable sources or are we drawing on finite resources like oil or coal? Do we need to drive all the kilometers that we do? Is our flight necessary? Are we lighting and heating our houses responsibly?

Alternative products already exist for many of us, as we all know. But, critically, alternative choices exist too. It’s time we began to exercise more robustly our power of choice and, as individuals and consumers, ramp up pressure on business, on policy-makers, and on each other to think about the impact we have on our home.

Conclusion

The free-market economic model that was born in the heart of the Industrial Revolution, and which has lasted 300 years, is not fit for the 21st Century and the challenges it presents. We must not insist on a return to business-as-usual.

We, therefore, call on business around the world to acknowledge that the rebuilding of our economies in the wake of this pandemic cannot merely return us to the way things were before. The private sector must accept its historic role in bringing us to this point, and take on both the responsibility as well as the opportunity to fix our problems, even where the government is slow to act.

ALLCOT and Conservation International Colombia, an alliance with a strong sustainable impact in benefit of the ecosystems and communities in Colombia.

Although Colombia has one of the worldwide highest indexes of biodiversity, it has decreased by 18% during the last years. The biggest threat is the natural habitat’s loss due to agriculture and cattle industries. It is our responsibility to protect the ecosystems and to fight against the climate change that affects much of the national territory, especially to the underprivileged communities.

ALLCOT, with more than 10 years of experience, develops worldwide sustainable projects providing its clients and collaborators with the knowledge and management expertise of initiatives aimed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) to actively fight against the climate change crisis. We establish a commitment and therefore create alliances with other companies that, like us,  appreciate the environment.

Conservation International Foundation (CI) works to highlight and maintain the benefits that nature provides to humanity. From the start, CI has worked to protect more than 5 million square km (2.3 square miles) of land and ocean across more than 70 countries. Currently, it is established among 29 countries and has 2 thousand partners around the world. 

Based on a solid foundation of science, partnership, and field demonstration, CI empowers societies to take care of nature, global diversity, and humanity’s well-being in a responsible and sustainable manner.

Thanks to the common values and the interest of both in recovering and working in favor of nature, ALLCOT and Conservation International Colombia join forces with the target of executing Sustainable Socio-Environmental Projects, aligned under the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) of United Nations, that have a strong impact in the conservation of the environment, adaptation to the climate crisis and the communities development.

“Today more than ever it is high time to act. Act with significant actions against the imperatives of the environmental crises and consequential social impacts. Thanks to the alliance with CI, our shared values, and long-term vision, we can accomplish our goals and commitments within Colombia” said Alexis L. Leroy, ALLCOT’s CEO.

“The development of carbon market in Colombia represents a great opportunity to consolidate conservation and sustainability processes of maximizing the benefits over strategic ecosystems and its communities. The experience of CI working on socio-environmental projects in the territory, added to that of ALLCOT in the design of GHG reduction projects, will allow the development and implementation of high-quality projects” says Fabio Arjona, vice president of the Colombia Conservation International program.

Sustainability in the fashion industry


Written by Natalia Rodrigo, Group Sustainability Technical Manager.


 

Recent studies on the fashion industry state that this sector highly needs to improve sustainability performance. Although it is true that most fashion brands are aware of their environmental and social impact, only less than half of them have started to take real action. In addition to this, fashion companies are not yet implementing sustainable solutions fast enough to effectively counteract all the negative impacts this hastily growing industry has.

Current patterns of production and consumption in the fashion industry endanger natural resources and generate a loss of biodiversity. Furthermore, it cannot be discarded increasing rates of carbon emissions, water consumption, chemical use, and waste generation. Considering that, our planet has already overcome its safe operating boundaries, restrictions on one or more of its key input factors cannot be discarded, making it difficult to grow at the projected rate of a predicted increase of 60% by 2030. 

In addition to this, other non-environmental challenging issues such as animal welfare, lack of transparency and negative image, for instance, pressuring society to live up to body ideals, cannot be consigned to oblivion.

It is a universally acknowledged truth that the fashion industry is regarded as a powerhouse for global development. This point can be illustrated by the position it has as one of the world’s largest consumer industries. As a result, this sector imperatively needs to perform differently. Far away from integrating profit and growth, fashion can provide additional value towards its products, resulting in tangible benefits across society as well as the world economy. 

Fashion, talent, and creativity always go hand in hand. This means that fashion has a far-reaching savoir-faire, is active on social media and counts with enough leverage to successfully work on its own transformation. 

Positively surprisingly, the fashion industry has already embarked on the challenging target of raising consumers ´awareness, undertaking for real and effective improvements, conforming wide networks dedicated to environmental, social, and transparent goals.

In addition to all of this, targeted investments made on technology as well as labor conditions and productivity, achievable heretofore will allow fashion brands to counterbalance current pressure. This point can be illustrated by current initiatives on converting textile waste into raw materials using advanced recycling techniques; reduce water and energy consumption due to innovative technology implementation as well as to integrate waste management techniques across production and distribution operations.

Taking all these new specialized strategies into account, a sneaking suspicion that acting differently nowadays as well as eagle eyeing for innovative solutions will provide these companies with a unique opportunity to manage and make certainly profitable growth forge ahead.

On the other hand, if no prompt action is taken, fashion brands will strain themselves to downgrade average unitary prices, deeper depreciation levels, rising costs, as well as resource shortage among the value chain. Undoubtedly, this industry is nowadays based on a linear ‘one-way street’ of take, make, and waste.

As a result, chain reactions across fashion are quite predictable. Considering current projections for growth in energy prices and salaries by 2030, fashion brands will suffer a decline in benefits if they still opt for business, as usual, consequently pledging their long-term resourcefulness.

In order to effectively address the rising environmental and social pressure, as well as to strike with the continuous industry boost, this sector is called to assess its footprint. In order to determine the industry’s environmental, social, and ethical gaps, ALLCOT helps the fashion industry to successfully identify the level of sustainability at each stage of the value chain. This strategy empowers companies to identify KPI´s and raise red flags for the weakest of them.  The main objective of this effort is to build-up knowledge, transparency, and overall sustainability. 

Without any doubt, this challenge in patterns ‘turnover also aims to establish the basis for prospective remodeling, investment channeling and innovation.

In conclusion, if the fashion industry does not take prompt and fast action on sustainability performance, its contribution to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will not be significant, putting into high risk the commitments of the Paris Agreement and therefore the Agenda 2030.  As a result, it is urgently needed to place environmental, social, and ethical improvements as an indispensable task within management’s agendas.

The fashion industry has the iron in the fire to empower large-scale environmental and social change.  Integrating more energy-efficient and conscientious use of limited resources, fair working conditions, as well as progressing on upstream and downstream issues along the value chain are key strategies to make this change a reality.

ALLCOT is changing the change…