Mahindra Racing first Formula E team and FIA World Championship entrant to be certified net Zero Carbon Footprint since inception

  • The most sustainable team on the grid becomes the first Formula E outfit and first FIA World Championship entrant to be certified Net Zero Carbon footprint
  • Pledges to the UNFCCC Sports for Climate Action Framework

As it continues its vital sustainability work at pace, Mahindra Racing is pleased to announce that it is the first Formula E team, and first FIA World Championship entrant, to be certified Net Zero Carbon footprint since inception. The certification has been approved by the ALLCOT Group for carbon emission offsetting for the entirety of the team’s existence.

The emission allowances have been marked for permanent removal from the pool of offsetting credits at the Environmental Registry on behalf of the team’s chosen REDD+ Project.

Established in 2009, ALLCOT is a leader in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions management tools and strategies for businesses of all sizes. By neutralizing GHG emissions, Mahindra Racing is not only able to protect the environment, but also provide community benefits that enhance profitability and brand value, increase employee satisfaction, to combat the climate crisis under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement, which is aligned with the UN 2030 Agenda, and promote the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

The REDD+ project protects 177,899 hectares of high conservation value rainforest in the state of Pará, Brazil and will prevent net emissions of >20 million tCO2e over the project lifetime. It is a registered Code REDD+ project; is validated and verified against VCS and in 2012 attained CCBA Gold level accreditation. This project protects threatened tree species like the pau rosa (Brazilian rosewood), provides jobs in forest management and monitoring, supports education in agro-forestry techniques to enable the community to grow cash crops, protects at risk animals like the Giant Anteater, Golden Parakeet and Ka’apor Capuchin Monkey and provides secured land tenure to villages committed to conservation.

In addition to Mahindra Racing’s Net Zero Carbon benchmark, it is also pleased to announce it has pledged to the UNFCCC Sports for Climate Action Framework alongside the FIA and Formula E. This initiative aims at supporting and guiding sports actors in achieving global climate change goals.

By committing to the framework, Mahindra Racing has pledged to five key principles; to undertake systematic efforts to promote greater environmental responsibility, to reduce overall climate impact, to educate for climate action, to promote sustainable and responsible consumption and to advocate for climate action through communication.

These new achievements add to the team’s previous sustainability endeavours including:

  • Becoming the first Formula E team in history to receive Three-Star Accreditation– the highest accolade in the FIA’s framework.
  • Committing to planting trees in the Araku Valley region of India thanks to its Season 6 tree planting campaign. Mahindra Racing’s efforts are in tandem with Mahindra Group’s commitment which has a commitment to plant 1 million trees every year
  • Partnering with One All Sports as its team kit supplier; a natural choice due to their shared vision and dedication to the use of sustainable materials, applications and processes.

“We believe that ‘doing good’ goes beyond philanthropy and CSR, it is more than just random acts of kindness. ‘Doing good’ is a purpose, an attitude, and a way of life; it is our guide for conducting business and ourselves. As a team that is committed to finding credible, advanced and next generation mobility solutions while being kind to the planet. At Mahindra Racing, we pledge to greater ROCE, which, for us, stands for Return On Climate and Environment. This is ingrained into our ethos and a big part of the reason we are racing in Formula E. We have been on this path of reducing our impact on the planet since our birth in 2014 and six years later we are carbon neutral since inception. We are also certified with Three-Star Excellence in sustainability. To this end, our efforts are and will continue to be, in tandem with Mahindra Group’s commitment and quest to achieve group-wide carbon neutrality. We look forward to kickstarting season 7 with ROCE as our guiding principle, towards setting innovative, competitive yet sustainable mobility benchmarks for the world.”

Dilbagh Gill, CEO and Team Principal.

“It is a great achievement for Mahindra Racing to become certified net zero carbon since inception. Mahindra Racing has become a leader in sustainability across the sporting landscape and promotes sustainable business practices across their supply chain. As the first Formula E team to attain FIA Three-star Environmental Accreditation and the most recent team to sign the UNFCCC Sports for Climate Action Framework, they are the perfect partners in the fight against climate change. The first manufacturer to join the Formula E grid and now the first to commit to Gen3, we’re delighted to have a long and ongoing relationship with another organisation so aligned to our vision and values.”

 Jamie Reigle, CEO, Formula E.

We are very proud and excited to be part of the Mahindra Racing sustainability team. Mahindra’s values and beliefs echoes our own. Sustainability or good management through Sustainable Development Goals are at the heart of Mahindra’s drive. It translates into these great achievements that we hope will inspire and lead to a virtuous competition among its pairs. Regardless, it sets great precedents that we aim to continue working and exceed whenever possible”.

Alexis Leroy, CEO, ALLCOT Group.


ENGRAW, a carbon-neutral committed company

ENGRAW contracted ALLCOT Group’s services for the ENGRAW’s 2019 Carbon Footprint report as part of its sustainability strategy.

ENGRAW is a company highly aware of caring for the environment. Its activity consists of processing mulesed-free Uruguayan wool, produced by healthy sheep and following the best livestock available practices. For the 2019 financial year, ENGRAW has decided to calculate its Carbon Footprint for the first time by turning to the expert company in Sustainability Services, ALLCOT Group.

The Carbon Footprint is calculated to know the amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) that are emitted directly or indirectly into the atmosphere as a result of the company’s activity. When referring to the carbon footprint of a company and the emission sources that are analyzed in its calculation, we use the term ‘scope’, classifying it into scope 1, 2 and 3. The scope of the calculation can be more or less ambitious depending on the interests of the company.

ENGRAW, being a company with a strong environmental commitment, has decided to calculate its carbon footprint at the corporate and factory level, covering the 3 scopes as follows:

  • Scope 1: GHG emissions associated with the direct consumption of fossil fuels for the operation of internal machinery, as well as the supply and treatment of water necessary for the development of production: boilers, forklifts, and utility vehicles.
  • Scope 2: indirect GHG emissions associated with the generation of electricity acquired and consumed by ENGRAW facilities. However, as this electricity was generated by its own wind turbines, these emissions were not accounted for.
  • Scope 3: Other indirect emissions such as water consumption and treatment, travel, accommodation, and waste.

On the other hand, ENGRAW has allocated part of its facilities to a tree plantation that is irrigated with treated effluent water from the company’s mill. ALLCOT Group, as an expert developer of climate change mitigation projects, has calculated the total equivalent tons captured from the atmosphere by this plantation, proving that not only does it contribute to the water reuse process, but that the plantation itself acts as a CO2 capture mechanism, mitigating ENGRAW’s environmental impact.

As an objective for 2021, ENGRAW will include in the scope of its next Carbon Footprint report its suppliers of wool raw material. In this way ENGRAW increases its ambition towards its goal of becoming a carbon neutral company.


NOTE FROM FEDERICO RAQUET- Managing Director of Engraw

Last but not least, we applied for the green export award in Uruguay a few weeks ago. Your report was submitted to endorse our environmental impact. Last week we were awarded the prize as the most environmentally friendly large export company in Uruguay. So thank you for your contribution to this achievement that made us very pleased.

Engraw Website.

Measuring Impact on Sustainable Development Goal Projects: From Good Intentions to Impact


Written by Wilson Rangel Sustainability Consultant.


According to the report, ‘Approaching the Future 2020’, the commitment of companies to the 2030 Agenda has increased progressively over the last 5 years, being today the third most relevant trend for the executives consulted.

Among other data, about 41% of the companies are already working on the Sustainable Development Goals, and 60% claim to have defined the SDG on which they will focus their contribution to 2030 Agenda.  These data reflect the growing interest in the corporate world to generate investment to achieve an impact on the SDG.

Despite this, institutional transformation has been slow to align business resources into effective actions to meet these ambitious global goals by 2030. In fact, a recent UN report points to an urgent need to modernize the global financial system in order to meet the SDG.

Indeed, the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) in 2019 discussed the need to increase financing to meet the ODS. Neverlethless, the key point is to make the best use of these resources, and the efficiency of these resources per se can help attract more resources.

For this reason, several international organizations have promoted Impact Evaluation as an effective way to provide scientific evidence of the impact of social investments on SDG. In Latin America in particular, the IDB Group uses Impact Evaluation to close knowledge gaps and build more effective investment models, with a view to increasing the efficiency and scale of investments that work best.

Corporate results frameworks, Impact Evaluations, and other tools help assure governments, aid funds, donors, and investors that the money has a tangible impact. In this way, social investment resources can be focused on the projects that have the greatest impact on SDG.

The ambitious goals of the Sustainable Development Goals have become a major challenge to meet. For this reason, the participation of the various stakeholders in society is fundamental: Governments, NGOs, companies, civil society. ALLCOT as an organization focused on climate change and sustainability services has managed to properly identify the structural conditions of the current market and understand that the key point is to increase resource efficiency.

ALLCOT has a portfolio of services focused exclusively on organizations that are interested in working on Sustainable Development Goals. In particular, these services are focused on efficiently managing the resources of the organizations and generating the greatest possible impact.

For organizations that are in an early and intermediate stage, ALLCOT provides advice for SDG Mapping, understanding what the impact of the organization’s business model with ODS is. It also helps organizations SDG Quantify in their business model.  Finally, it supports organizations in managing the impact on SDG through an Improvement Roadmap.

On the other hand, for organizations that are at a mature stage and make social investments in particular programs, ALLCOT provides advice on measuring impact on SDG, and thus helping organizations to efficiently invest their resources in the right programs.

Achieving the ambitious Sustainable Development Goals of 2030 Agenda is a major challenge for society at large, but the best way to meet the challenge is to use all resources in the most efficient way. This ensures that the resource is generating the greatest possible impact.

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES (SDGS) AND THE WINE SECTOR


Written by Karen Vega, Business Development Specialist.

 


Times are hard all over the world because of the social, health and economic crisis caused by the pandemic. In these times of great uncertainty and in this critical economic situation, the wine sector, along with other agricultural sectors, will have to intensify their environmental efforts in line with the European Green Pact and the ‘From Farm to Fork’ and Biodiversity strategies.

The European Green Pact establishes an action plan for:

  • Encourage efficient use of resources by promoting practices towards a clean and circular economy.
  • Restore biodiversity and reduce pollution.

Many winegrowers and their cooperatives have been strengthening their sustainability policies in recent years, placing great emphasis on the mitigation of their emissions. Viticulture is an essential part of rural ecosystems and offers a range of benefits that go far beyond wine production. However, in order to achieve the objectives of the European Green Pact, viticulture must have the opportunity to invest in the protection of its natural resources and have adequate guidance and support from government institutions.

Among the main advantages and benefits of the implementation of sustainable practices are: increased energy efficiency, access to specific financing programs for sustainable products, improved commercial image, mitigation of economic risks due to future legislation, transparency and increased confidence of their stakeholders and cost optimization throughout the value chain.

Main SDGs involved in the wine sector:

Companies can have a great positive impact on society by promoting responsible consumption and a healthier lifestyle. On the other hand, they must also improve working conditions throughout the labor chain, ensuring the physical and emotional integrity and safety of their workers.
Promote and invest in content of interest related to the wine sector and sustainable lifestyles to ensure access to employees with skills that meet future business needs.
Also the realization of internal training plans that help to improve the awareness and efficiency of employees.
On the one hand, implement training and support programs and, on the other hand, invest in the integration of technology into agricultural systems as a key facilitator to create opportunities for women to participate in viticulture and at the same time fulfill family responsibilities.
Apply precise agricultural technologies that enhance productivity and minimize water use. This includes drip irrigation systems, water quality control, efficient crop rotation and field application methods, waste control, efficient use of water both for grape washing and at the infrastructure level, etc. This also enhances the resilience of the sector to imminent climatic variations such as drought.
Sustainable initiatives in the wine sector include the adoption of measures that ensure decent, fair and inclusive work: fair labour contracts, flexible working hours, breaks, eradication of child labour. On the other hand, especially in these difficult times, we must promote the creation of synergies with other sectors such as tourism and hotels.

From the point of view of infrastructure, seek investment to support the development of agriculture and markets that include water, connectivity/technology, roads, storage logistics, etc. In this way, the social and technological occupation and development of agricultural areas is promoted.

Wine, being an agricultural product with high added value, is an economic activity that contributes significantly to the establishment of population in rural areas. Its good practices can safeguard the natural heritage of the surrounding areas, promote urbanization and transport plans, improve air quality in the surrounding communities, etc.

Organic farming is the most responsible way to produce food. It is necessary to put in value the commitment to ecological viticulture and sustainable production: to promote recycling, the reuse of organic material either in the manufacture of compost or in the generation of energy from biomass, etc.

Reducing the environmental footprint by implementing new practices and technologies such as the use of renewable energy, reduction of logistic flow, optimization of water use, reduction of greenhouse gases and other pollutants, among others. On the other hand, the cultivation hectares are also used for projects to fight climate change such as CO2 sequestration.

 

The absence of systemic pesticides and herbicides allows and favors a rich variety of both plant cover and insects and birds in the organic vineyard.

 

 

The importance of the food sector in sustainability


Written by Karen Vega, Business Development Specialist.

 


1. SDG ADVANTAGES IN THE FOOD SECTOR.

Sustainability should not be confused with terms such as ecological, biological or organic product. Sustainability is a step beyond and covers multiple aspects that are part of the company’s context such as reputational image, concerns of its stakeholders, use of natural resources, protection and conservation of biodiversity, among others.
In 2015, the United Nations established 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which require joint action by governments, private sector companies, civil society and all citizens in order to achieve them. The SDG are an ambitious plan of action for people, the planet and prosperity, and companies play an important role in achieving them.

In the face of the current growing relevance of SDG, companies in the food sector are beginning to align their strategies with the 17 SDG, integrating many of these issues into their business model, supply chain and stakeholder relationships; investing in sustainable sourcing, processes, materials, machinery and products throughout the value chain.

We are in a challenging time for corporate resilience and although it presents many challenges it also opens a range of opportunities for those companies that have the vision and commitment to lead the changes that are coming.

The SDGs can be used to guide, direct, communicate and report on their strategies, objectives and activities, allowing companies to capitalize on a variety of benefits and create added value to their business. Some of these opportunities and benefits are:

  1. Obtain a broader vision of the sector, its environment and its needs, allowing the identification
    and even creation of future market niches.
  2. The SDG aims to realign global public and private investment flows by reorienting them to meet sustainability objectives. Allowing small businesses and entrepreneurs, committed to sustainable and inclusive business models, to connect with capital to grow their business;
  3. Decrease business and reputational risks by reducing their climate impact and adopting fair and inclusive labor practices.
  4. Building resilience to the costs and/or requirements imposed by future legislation.
  5. Strengthen relationships with stakeholders and remain at the forefront of new policies.
  6. The SDG brings together priorities and purposes in all its dimensions (social, economic, environmental) allowing the use of a common language that can help create synergies with governments, NGOs and other businesses.

2. HOW TO START THE PROCESS TOWARDS A SUSTAINABLE COMPANY.

The process of becoming a sustainable company includes knowing its impact on natural resources, generation of waste and spills, generation of direct and indirect emissions, as well as the interrelations with its stakeholders. ALLCOT helps companies to determine this starting point through its services of environmental footprint calculation and mapping of Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

Once this baseline has been identified, it is necessary to know then how to take actions that will make our company improve its focus on sustainability and be aligned with global agreements on the issue, the demands of our stakeholders and the requirements of Agenda 2030. All companies, regardless of their size or sector, have a responsibility to comply with all relevant legislation, respect internationally recognized minimum standards and uphold universal human rights.

ALLCOT helps companies to meet their obligations and guide them to take initiatives beyond these minimum responsibilities to advance social and environmental goals.

From ALLCOT, we quantify, evaluate and help design your strategy for mitigation and sustainability through:

From ALLCOT we offer our clients a wide range of possibilities to strengthen their strategy and message on sustainability.

Written by Natalia Rodrigo Vega, Head Group Business Development ALLCOT.


Established in 2009, ALLCOT is a veteran project developer offering knowledge, expertise, and management to initiatives that reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to actively combat the climate crisis under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement is aligned with the 2030 Agenda and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

ALLCOT develops emission reduction projects under various carbon quantification standards (CDM, VCS, GS) and for various sectors (forestry, waste, renewable energy) covering the entire carbon credit value chain its later management in the markets created under the Paris Agreement.

ALLCOT supports projects, companies and public bodies to improve their sustainability performance by offering consultancy services, including the development of strategies to calculate, reduce and offset GHG emissions, as well as the identification of best practices for reporting on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

For ALLCOT, sustainability has always been a priority on our agenda and modus operandi, is part of the DNA of all of us who make up ALLCOT. At ALLCOT we are committed to sustainability towards our employees. Without a sustainable model for our TEAM, it is difficult to sell a sustainable business model to outside.

Therefore, from our organization we promote flexibility and teleworking before the pandemic. The fact that our staff are masters of their time, without leaving aside their work commitments, improves their self-esteem and efficiency in their jobs and, at the same time, allows them to reconcile with their personal life, hobbies and other
obligations. In fact, we have seen that there has been no decrease in the response capacity during the pandemic and we have all been working at maximum capacity all these months.

The COVID-19 pandemic is significant threat to the health and well-being of billions of people around the world. As the world begins to open up from the blockages and enters a state of unprecedented vulnerability, or what many have called “the new normal” it makes sense to reflect on what we have learned, review our fundamental assumptions, and begin to chart a course to continue working TOGETHER to build a sustainable world.

Without a doubt, the pandemic has had a significant impact on our work. On the one hand, in view of our projects being implemented, the pandemic has made field visits impossible and follow-up and socialization work has had to be done remotely. This has not paralyzed our work, but it has slowed it down and helped to generate more uncertainty in the study of primary and secondary sources.

For this reason, ALLCOT has invested all its strength in seeking alternatives to these new uncertainties generated in the project and to be able to successfully close all its phases.
On the other hand, in relation to the projects that we had pending to execute, we have to adapt and reinvent ourselves to this “new normality”. The coronavirus pandemic presents an excellent opportunity for us to act in solidarity so that we may be able to turn this crisis into an incentive to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

Initially, our objective was focused on supporting companies and institutions, both in thepublic and private sectors, focused on leisure activities, events, catering and tourism. As a result of the pandemic, these sectors are defined as the most affected, so their financial capacity is limited to being able to continue their business and it is very difficult for them to make extraordinary investments. For this reason, from ALLCOT we have strengthened our scope of prospecting and opening business towards the food, energy and transport sectors.

From the company we offer our clients a wide range of possibilities to strengthen their strategy and message in sustainability. Our work relates to non-financial reporting, sustainability reporting, environmental footprint reporting (emissions, plastic) and our flagship product: the mapping, identification, quantification and monitoring of SDG.

ALLCOT has merged its know-how in climate change project development, being our strengths the development of quantification and monitoring tools together with its experience in sustainability to develop a unique and innovative tool. This tool helps us to know at regional (country, nation) and sector level, the degree of commitment and alignment with SDG and Agenda 2030.

Article originally published in Corresponsables.

ALLCOT and Green Tank, an alliance to promote sustainability and a low-carbon economy in Mexico.

The two companies join forces to support organizations in achieving sustainable and non-polluting business models. The alliance aims to respond to current needs of the Mexican market and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations.

From the time of the launch of Agenda 21 and, more recently, the Agenda 2030, Mexico has actively voiced her commitment to sustainable development and to strengthening the channels for monitoring, communicating and regulating actions that have allowed us to reduce the gap between the high indices of inequality and the high indices of pollution of the 1980s up to the second decade of the 21st century. Undoubtedly, the COVID 19 pandemic of 2020 marks a turning point—not only in Mexico—that calls for being even more rigorous and exhaustive in complying with sustainability goals. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) take on greater relevance and emphasize the right path for humanity and the planet.  

Mexico became a signatory to the Agenda 2030 and the Paris Climate Agreement and included their objectives in national planning through passing reforms to the legal framework and prioritizing those goals in the development strategies. Green House Gas Emissions (GHG) are to be reduced by 22% in 2030 and by 50% by 2050, and the national contribution to the Paris Agreement is being updated to reflect a vision of net zero emissions by mid-century.

To meet its climate mitigation objectives, Mexico established a carbon tax in 2014 and, with its launch of a carbon trading system in 2023, will become the first Latin American country to set a ceiling on emissions through efficiency schemes that promote competitiveness in sustainability. In addition, in 2020 Mexico presented its National Strategy for Implementation of the Agenda 2030 including concrete action plans for achieving each of the 17 SDGs and putting people in the center of the development program under the slogan, “No One Left Behind”.

In response to these priorities, ALLCOT and Green Tank, after many years of promoting sustainability with different approaches, draw closer to combine efforts and advance toward a shared purpose. Today, our goal of promoting compliance with the SDGs and protecting the planet’s resources is intensified, but above all, we strive together to generate prosperity, shared value and promote better living conditions in communities.

ALLCOT, with more than 10 years of experience, develops sustainable projects around the world, supporting its clients and collaborators with know-how and management of initiatives that fulfill the Sustainable Development Goals and actively combat the climate crisis by reducing emissions of Greenhouse Gases (GHG). Since 2017, ALLCOT began operations in Mexico aimed at breaking paradigms in the private and public sectors by promoting vigorous efforts to reduce greenhouse gases through adopting sustainable projects designed to produce social impacts. Also, we have served as a spokesperson for the SDGs with leaders in banking, industry, waste management, construction, tourism and academia. ALLCOT is committed to and forms alliances with companies that, like us, value the environment.

The Green Tank team applies its extensive international experience and multi-disciplinary backgrounds to support businesses as change agents that protect the environment to foster successful and regenerative economies. Green Tank offers strategy, management and communication of projects and products that favor the planet and apply the Triple Impact approach. Our consultancy works to create shared value through collaborative models that stimulate cooperation among businesses and exchange of products or services between Large Businesses and Small and Medium Enterprises for achieving energy efficiency and the circular economy. Green Tank consulting services enable businesses to develop business strategies and measure and comply with the SDGs of the Agenda 2030, and the firm is committed to the movement of B Corps.

ALLCOT and Green Tank merge their pathways and combine tools to pursue a single vision of forming sustainable alliances to promote a sustainable and low-carbon economy and, why not?, to advance towards a carbon-neutral economy motivated by promoting the well-being of the people, communities and organizations where we leave our marks.

Nature’s time bomb


Written by Felipe JiménezClimate Change Mitigation Consultant


Humankind is destroying natural environments at accelerating rates. Deforestation, extensive agriculture, climate change, habitat invasion, biodiversity loss, and wildlife traffic, not only destroy vital ecosystem goods and services for humans but also open the way to zoonotic diseases and contamination of urban centers exposing people to deadly pathogens like the SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the current Covid-19 pandemic. It was a matter of time for this time bomb to explode and cause such a dramatic impact in the world, as a result of environmental overexploitation and biodiversity’s mismanagement. 

Governments, with the help of local and international organizations, have a great opportunity and responsibility to set their countries and the world on a more sustainable path. Currently, policies and subsidies have been structured towards the protection and conservation of ecosystems and biodiversity. Governments have understood the importance of reforming subsidies that are harmful to nature and introducing the payment of taxes for those activities involved in environmental degradation and biodiversity loss. The encouragement and promotion of effective nature-based projects and the strengthening of environmental monitoring and regulation procedures are being backed up by the governments and private sector initiative of creating more nature-based jobs. This in turn boosts up the economy and supports recovery processes within the ecosystems, promoting biodiversity’s conservation and restoration.

In addition to these actions, governments all around the world have banned wildlife traffic and taken precautionary measures to ensure food security and healthy consumption. In the same way, society leaders have conducted educational campaigns to raise awareness about the importance of establishing more sustainable alternative activities and confronting the problem through green investment and reinforcement of a more environmentally friendly economy and market. 

Given the current situation, ALLCOT has a clear vision of its role in enhancing practices for the promotion of a resilient and well-functioning ecosystem. As a leader in the formulation of sustainable and climate change mitigation projects, ALLCOT supports the conservation of ecosystems and thus, the protection of biodiversity. Through the projects focused on reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, ALLCOT tackles deforestation and forest fragmentation restoring biological corridors and protecting flora and fauna species, especially those key species considered vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered due to their role as environmental indicators of a healthy ecosystem. Together with the mitigation and climate action scheme, ALLCOT develops a variety of sustainable initiatives around renewable energy, energy and resource management, and waste management. Through these series of projects, the organization conducts a qualitative evaluation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) that could be positively impacted by the project’s activities and is currently working on a methodology that will allow monitoring this impact.

Among the activities that support the implementation of these programs, the projects include educational campaigns towards wildlife traffic, the correct resource, and environmental management, finance administration, governance, social leadership, etc. Additionally, supporting the previous idea of the encouragement and promotion of nature-based projects, ALLCOT develops well-structured plans that involve local community participation which gives them the opportunity to establish and learn about sustainable alternative activities and businesses.

 We must realize that when we destroy biodiversity, we destroy the system that supports human life. Resources overexploitation, plastic pollution, overfishing, and the contamination of water sources are some additional critical issues that humankind must confront through the alignment of sustainable initiatives and actions. The formulation of such nature-based projects must receive clear support from the government and the private sector. These investments and subsidies will create a more resilient economy and will also tackle social problems such as poverty and hunger. Allcot’s contribution to the conformation and realization of these projects highlights the strong commitment that the organization has with the Paris Agreement objectives and the 2030 Agenda goals.

The SDG index, a Tool for a more Accurate Monitoring of Sustainable Development in Latin America


Written by Andrés Melendro, Sustainability Manager


Last Wednesday, June 16th, the Center for Sustainable Development for Latin America (CODS) launched its SDG Index: a measure of the progress of Latin American and Caribbean countries towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The report highlights that, overall, the region is not meeting the goals set forth in the 2030 Agenda, and that the health and economic crisis linked to the COVID-19 pandemic also represents a considerable setback in most of the SDGs. If the current trend continues, the goals set in 2015 would not materialize even on a 50-year horizon.

SDG 13, Climate Action, stands out as an exception because widespread quarantines and restrictions on production have led to a considerable drop in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, the rebound effect is foreseeable since the reduction is circumstantial. In particular, it is possible that the interest of investing in sustainable projects and green technologies gets delayed by the haste to reactivate or protect sectors of greater importance for the immediate future of a company. In this sense, ALLCOT’s work to develop projects that generate financial incentives to reduce emissions is more relevant than ever.

The methodology advanced by the CODS is based on the one that the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) has been using for several years worldwide to establish international comparisons. The CODS adjusts it to the statistical reality of the countries of the region, given the unavailability of many indicators. In this way, the comparison becomes more valid. In some cases, for some States, there is no available methodology for SDG measurement. Another issue is the lack of data: the index requires figures ex-ante and ex-post 2015 to measure progress since the creation of the 2030 Agenda.

The report also includes a visualization tool called the dashboard. This allows to highlight, through a traffic light code, how close an SDG is to being fulfilled, in order to serve as a prioritization tool in each country.

The publication of the SDG Index, as well as the creation of the municipal SDG indexes in Colombia cities by the Corona Foundation through its network tracking cities’ wellbeing, illustrate the trend towards the appropriation of the SDGs by non-governmental entities and their measurement at sub-national scales. The private sector, and in particular organizations setting standards for corporate sustainability reports, have also included the SDGs in their performance metrics. Precisely, ALLCOT is currently developing statistical tools to quantify the impact of the socioeconomic co-benefits of its climate change mitigation projects, through the 230 indicators associated with the 17 SDGs.

This exercise presents several challenges, given that the project areas tend to be smaller than local political-administrative divisions in the country where the project is developed and usually do not coincide with their geographical limits. ALLCOT, like the CODS, adapts the SDG indicators to the real data availability and to variables that make more sense depending on the specific context. In addition, to mitigate the absence of local data in many rural areas of developing countries, ALLCOT has created mechanisms for collecting primary data to establish a meaningful SDG baseline. In this way, ALLCOT takes a leadership role in measuring corporate impact on sustainable development.